Monday, February 23, 2009

sos

I'm not sending out a distress signal about ships; it's about our students.

I do not pretend to be a perfect parent [hello, blog title]. I know I'm not a perfect teacher. Yet I am reasonably certain that the following techniques are less than ideal when trying to raise a responsible young person:
  • Consulting with teachers about why one's child has to make up the hours missed from classes when he was suspended from school
  • Calling one's child during class to find out of she "needs to be at school" for the last period
  • Claiming one didn't realize it wasn't appropriate to text one's child during class to remind him to turn in his homework
  • Offering to come to school with one's child to make sure she's attending classes and doing her work
  • Telling a concerned teacher who calls to check on her often-absent child that she hasn't "seen him in a few days"
  • Revealing in a phone call (with a teacher one has never actually met, who is simply calling to inform one of missing work) graphic & unflattering details of one's child's emotional & behavioral issues
  • Insisting one's child just cannot get out of bed in time to make first period, which starts at 8:30

I grow weary.

17 comments:

OHN said...

The cycle continues. UGH.

Kari said...

Oh my! I have the highest respect for teachers. I could not do it - I wouldn't have the patience.

Texan Mama @ Who Put Me In Charge said...

I can feel your pain... just remember that the crowd you're teaching is already needing a little extra TLC because maybe their regular school was too much for them (You are at an alternative school, right? Just wanted to make sure I had my details straight.)

And those parents, while I am sad for them that probably no one made THEM be responsible for themselves when THEY were in school, I also get that (in a few of those cases) at least they are still trying to stay connected with their kid and the school. It could be worse... they could send their kids off to school and say to the teachers, "You deal with them. It's your problem from 8-3". I've gotten that speech.

Danielle said...

That is so unfortunate. What is wrong with these parents??? You are a good woman for doing what you do. Keep it up.

Janet said...

The one who hasn't seen her child in a few days? Just sad...so sad.

Lisa Wheeler Milton said...

I'll pet your head today.

Lisa said...

Oh boy...Well, I won't tell you about the unflattering things I said about Garbo when the counselor called about her last episode of fake sick.

And I'm sure I ended my tirade about my crazy child with "Thank you for calling,but now I have to go blog this...."

(Hangs head. Hopes husband the teacher doesn't read Bad Mom to see my comment.)

Fantastic Forrest said...

You certainly have high expectations, Miss Stephanie.

These are indeed exasperating situations. However, keep repeating with me: "The Glass Is Half Full." Imagine dealing with some of these parents:

http://www.parentsbehavingbadly.com/

I'll bet you feel a whole lot better. (warning - that is not a terribly funny site)

Cheri @ Blog This Mom! said...

I would be weary too.

You are a saint. Really. I've always thought so. A fun saint, too.

Hairline Fracture said...

Wow. Hang in there, Stephanie.

ms-teacher said...

I feel your pain.

brandy101 said...

Prayers for you, the kids and their sometimes misguided guardians/parents.

Minnesota Matron said...

Believe me, I know. I get them when they're nearly grown-ups. One of them puts his baseball cap over his face and simply falls asleep every day. Sigh. He's 22.

Shana said...

Oy.

Jenn @ Juggling Life said...

It is pretty hard to take. Deep breaths.

Fantastic Forrest said...

I love your teacher posts.

Check this out from someone else. It will make you laugh:
http://www.poorpenmanship.com/2009/02/rules-of-proper-english.html

Suzanne said...

You so deserve a raise. All teachers do.

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